Practitioners 5: Eduardo Risso

As a catch up for all new visitors to Beyond the Bunker, we’ll be representing the original Practitioners series 1-55 (Simon BisleyChris Bachalo and featuring the most influential comic creatives in history). Thoroughly incomplete but featuring legends like Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Frank Miller and Alan Moore already more will be hitting the site every two alternate weeks. For now though, sit back every Tuesday for a run-down of the men and women who created the comic industry we know today. (Or check the full list in the menus above). This week: 100 Bullets and Batman artist and long-running Azzarello creative partner, Eduardo Risso.

Following on from the previous feature on Brian Azzarello we’re looking at the other creative that made 100 Bullets what it was – a pivotal, gravitational piece of visceral and memorable power.


Only an artist with the craftsmanship to make a coffee machine a focus in a scene filled with tension and intrigue could have maintained the awe inspiring integrity and scope of a series like 100 Bullets. Every once in a while an artist will simply prove the power of a black line on a white canvass and no one shows the clarity and purpose of line placement better than Eduardo Risso. He is the dangerous surgeon of the practitioners – his knowledge of anatomy, feature and form informing a sharp, efficient and unflinching style that tears the page between pitch blackness and sharp simple colours – a playground for colourists Grant Goleash and Patricia Mulvihill. In a yankee-centric medium Risso is now synonomous with Brian Azzarello and 100 Bullets, however Eduardo Risso is a multinational artist reknowned in North and South America and Europe for his graphic, noirish linework and efficient and poster-natural artwork. As a western reader, embedded in American comic books anyone’d be forgiven for believing his name was made in the US. Not so.

Like a wandering Mariachi, Risso was born in Leones in Córdoba Province, Argentina and started as a cartoonist in 1981, drawing his first collaborations for the morning paper La Nación and the magazines Erotiocon and Satiricon in his home country. In 1986, he worked for Eura Editoriale of Rome, Italy, and in 1987 he drew Parque Chas, scripted by Ricardo Barreiro. The series was first published by Fierro in Argentina, comic history, and then by Totem in Spain, Comic Art in Italy and finally the complete series as a graphic novel in France, Germany, Denmark, Belgium, Holland, Poland and the United States – no doubt catching the attention of comic industry decision makers there. In 1988, he drew Cain, again scripted by Barreiro, again in Black and White giving rise to a clear inking style that was unforgiving to detail. With each new series Risso’s work has increased in clarity and precision.

He is prolific in his work – every year of working on 100 Bullets turfing up other work including Batman 620-625. Most recently he can be found in the pages of Logan 1-3. The canuckle head giving a character that could’ve been born with Risso in mind to Risso’s gritty and dominating style. While 100 Bullets remains Risso’s most prominent achievement (covering 11 years of his working history and earning him an Eisner for Best Artist) we haven’t seen the best of him yet.

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2 Year Old Abandons Parents, Sibling to be Devoured by T.Rex

You’re in your favourite coat and a nice hat and it’s a lovely day. Nothing can break your stride on a day like this. Later on you’ll be sitting in your living room, all warm and snug with Mum and Dad and the little brother/sister. Hooray!! I love my Mum and Dad.. But what is this?

SHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIT!!!

I would not want to be with that child if a real disaster occured. No good yellow belly. You judge for yourself.

Anchorman 2 Trailer: F.U. Law of Diminishing Returns (and San Diego)

The second official teaser trailer for ‘Anchorman 2’ starring Will Ferrell, Steve Carell, Paul Rudd, David Koechner and Luke Wilson. Ron Burgundy and the news crew reunite for more laughs. “This time there will be sub-machine guns and boobies”. Whammie!

There’ll be no boobs!! Not if it’s anything like the original. But there might be fights between them and the Channel 6 News Team. Only question is; where’s Veronica Corningstone?

Fallen Heroes 2 Ready to Go!

Fallen Heroes 2 has been completed is currently going to print. The hope is that it will be resting alongside the larger Unseen Shadows graphic novel at Thoughtbubble but we cannot confirm that at this stage as the book is so close to the date in question. We have no doubt that Stu at Ukomics is doing everything he can to make sure visitors at Leeds get to have a look at the new edition.

Featuring Ben ‘The Hand’ Ashodi and Stephanie Connisbee from the previous issue (and the Tales of the Fallen Graphic novel) as well as introducing some pivotal characters and developments to the FH canon, it’s been put together by Barry Nugent (writer of the original novel and general demagogue), Martin Conaghan (writer and calm voice of reason), Steve Penfold (me, on pencils and inks), Gat Melvyn (colours, seamlessly professional) and Paul Mclaren (lettering and diligent communicator).