A Christmas message from Dan and…erm…Santa

We’re really excited about some of the things Beyond the Bunker are doing in 2014 so Dan decided to go enlist the help of the only man jolly enough to convey how awesome it’s going to be. This is the absolute truth and we most definitely did not sneak into a grotto after closing time and sit in the chair.

Thanks to everyone who bought the book over the last year, we hope you dig some of the stuff that we’ll be brining out in 2014.

Have a great Christmas and New Year everyone!

Dan & Steve
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Dan talks comics with Lazy as Funk

I think it’s fair to say that MCM was pretty insane. We have honestly never been busier than we were over those three crazy days and it was great to be able to introduce so many new people to Moon.

Amidst the selling though we did get a chance to chat with some lovely people and among them was the wonderfully named “Lazy and Funk” youtube channel. Have a look and enjoy me talking about MCM while Steve hovers like I’m about to rat him out for a murder. Stick around to the very end to get an insight into just how much I love the newly re-printed Moons.

We’ll be posting up some more stories and pictures from MCM over the coming weeks so keep checking back. Thanks again to everyone who came to say hi!

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Moon goes to Cardiff!

Cardiff complete crop

Two years ago(isn) I attended my first ever convention in Cardiff. We had a stand all day but we sold out in less than 1 hour. I still don’t know how that happened as the books were selling at a rate of more than one a minute. That was Fallen Heroes, my first complete issue, and boy, did it give me the wrong impression of world in indy comics. But it remains a very cool memory of my first drop into indy comics. Folks were friendly, both in front and behind the tabletops.

This time it’s Moon heading to Cardiff, on a table that became spare at the last minute. Dan’s lovely wife, Fi, is having her birthday this weekend and it was decided that Dan should fulfill his husbandly duties and spend it with her.

So it is me, Lonely warrior of the South East who will make the trek to the highlands of the countries great principality. I look forward to close harmony singing and I don’t look forward the inevitability of rain – as I understand it, if it’s a nice weekend it will be the first in 3000 years and will be believed to be an omen of the apocalypse by the local gentry. I may have misunderstood much of what I claim to understand of Cardiff. But it was raining last time….

In all seriousness, we look forward to bringing our Defender of the British Isles to meet our brothers in Wales. Despite spending many years in England, Moon is a great fan of consistent, passionate rugby and so has never known who to back in the 6 Nations. Just not the French.

New BUY MOON IMAGE SLIM

London Super Comic Con Is Almost Here!

LSCC Event HeaderLast year’s inaugural London Super Comic Convention proved to be one of the great surprise hits of last year’s con season. In the face of doubts over whether the capital could sustain yet another large con the event confounded expectations and emerged as something genuinely unique and well deserving of any fan’s attention.

The great thing about LSCC is that it is entirely focused on comics. You won’t find big games companies running demos or  panels packed with film and tv stars here, instead LSCC have assembled the largest gathering of comic book creators that you’ll find anywhere in the UK. On top of this you’ll find a plethora of dealers and indy publishers ready to introduce you to your new favourite book. It’s like walking around one gigantic comic book shop; unpretentious, low-fi and a lot of fun.

Moon Page 2.2

We shall be there this weekend with an arsenal of big Moony wares for you to wrap your mitts around. If you missed the Moon launch then this will be your first chance to pick up Moon #2 and if you want to introduce a friend to the book then we’ll be running a special bundle deal on both issues for new readers. In addition we’ve got a few of the ever popular Moon prints (guaranteed to protect you from falling Russian asteroids) and a whole bundle of badges. Steve will be on hand to do sketches and discuss commissions and I will be doing whatever it is that writers do at conventions (handing you your change, doing coffee runs, rescuing Steve from security when he forgets his pass etc).

It’s been ages since we were last in London so please drop by and let us know how it’s going. You can find us at table C43 as shown on this fine annotated map produced by the lovely Michael Georgiou (be sure to check out his new graphic novel “Just Exhale” which launches at the show).

LSCC floor plan 2013You can pre-order tickets and see a full line up of guests at the LSCC website.

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Dan’s Blog: Looking Ahead to 2013

Dan Banner

Well, we have a new site so I thought it was about time I set about populating it a little bit. 2012 was a bit of an odd year for me all in all. On the one hand delays on all the books I wrote meant that almost nothing with my name on it actually came out while on the other Jim Eaton and I found our comedy writing partnership really start to take off.

The comic delays were frustrating at the time but ultimately that’s life in Indy comics. I’ve always felt that I’d rather see a book done well than done fast and while it sucks having disappoint fans at a convention when they come to pick up the new book, I’d rather they go away empty handed than go away with something that’s not as good as it could be. While it’s fun to maintain the fantasy that we all make comics 24/7 the reality is that these artists have lives (and jobs) outside of comics and life can be crushingly unsympathetic when it comes to giving you the time you need to get that page finished.

comedyeditsThe comedy success really came out of the left field if I’m honest. Jim and I have been writing together since Devil’s Fork (initially because it seemed like a good excuse to meet up and drink port) but it was never more than a hobby. We weren’t even going to enter a competition last year but I thought of a couple of Shakespeare jokes one morning and gave Jim a call, he came round and an hour later we’d pretty much written A Comedy of Edits. We knew the script made us laugh (especially after the cast added their own tweaks) but we certainly didn’t mean for to do as well as it did when we put it in for the 2 Days Laughter competition. We won Best Script as well as the Grand Prize and were suddenly left wondering whether we should be taking all this silliness a bit more seriously.

So where does that leave us for this year? Well if you’re kind enough to have read this far then here’s a few bits and bobs that have got me particularly fired up for 2013:

  1. I have an Unseen Shadows comic called “Ashfall” in the pencil stages at the moment. It’s got Peter Mason on pencils which I’m extremely pleased about as I’ve been a fan of Pete’s work ever since meeting him at Demoncon last year. The book is a 23 page story set in Rio and it was a tonne of fun to write so I hope you enjoy it.
  2. Moon #2’s fist London showing. Moon #2 came out in November last year but it occurred to me yesterday that Moon Launch and a couple of comic shops aside, the book as actually not appeared in London yet. It’s a London-centric book and a lot of its fans live here so I’m really excited about taking it to Super Comic Con next month and seeing what the response is like.
  3. Moon #3. Steve’s clearing his in-tray of other comic work at the moment so that he can devote all his efforts to getting #3 out as quickly as possible. For the first time, I’m not twiddling my thumbs either as I’ve decided to take the chance to rewrite the script for #3 (the original script was penned in early 2009!) and hopefully apply a few of the things I’ve learnt in the past few years to make it sing a bit more. After years of basically just promoting Moon, it’s nice to be writing him again.
  4. Moon #4. Erm…not sure. Steve says it could happen this year, we’ll see. If it’s done, it’ll be out.
  5. Jim and I are working on a new comedy project that we can’t really talk about but it’s very exciting and taking up most of my free time. If it turns into something, you’ll be the first to know.
  6. More live music nights. We’re working on ways to put on more nights like the Moon Launch. They’re a boatload of fun and it’d be great if we can make them happen on a semi-regular basis. No firm plans yet but we’ll see what can be done.
  7. Oh and I have a mini-comic comic out digitally at some point in the year. It’ll be through the Unseen Shadows site and I’m stoked about the person who has agreed to pencil it (secret for now).

Shades banner

Plenty to keep me busy and I’m sure there will be a few more bits cropping up along the way. The plan is to update the website less often that in the past (we were on a daily posting schedule for a while) but for the stuff we do post to be more interesting and not just any old random stuff we find (though there will probably be a wee bit of that too).

Hope to see as many of you as possible at cons during the year.

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Practitioners 9: Grant Morrison

As a catch up for all new visitors to Beyond the Bunker, we’ll be representing the original Practitioners series 1-55 (Simon BisleyChris Bachalo and featuring the most influential comic creatives in history). Thoroughly incomplete but featuring legends like Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Frank Miller and Alan Moore already more will be hitting the site every two alternate weeks. For now though, sit back every Tuesday for a run-down of the men and women who created the comic industry we know today. (Or check the full list in the menus above). This week: Global comics megastar and frustrated visionary; Grant Morrison.

All Star Superman 6 (DC, 2006)

Grant Morrison is a scottish comic book writer and playwright born 31 January 1960 who harnesses and embraces the full power of literature, psychology, history, science and mixes it all with an acute awareness of readership and popular culture. Sending Frankenstein to a land at the end of human experience and standing Wolverine and Sabretooth at the urinals of the Hellfire Club in the pursuit of perfect storytelling in comic books, drawing on a bewildering array of sources to bring forth writing that elevates and encourages its readership with rich language and deep, irony laced ideas of impossible futures and near unrecognisable presents, outer dimensions and the end of many worlds. Due to leave comic books at the end of his run with Batman, Morrison’s legacy will be one that lasts.

All Star Superman

Never scared of the poignant or the difficult Morrison has the canny knack of shifting seamlessly from the scientific explanation of a Voyager Titan mentally preparing to be launched into deep space for centuries in All Star Superman to the very real failure of Scott Summers to retain his marriage in the wake of post traumatic stress he is unable to express in New X-Men. It his acknowledgment of the need to ground – at least to the degree required for a readers’ mind if not in real terms – absurd statements and events with less abstract and more concise human situations and scenarios, underpinning everything with realistic and recognisable reactions.

He achieves this while still understanding the bare bones of comic book storytelling – still revelling in the idea of superheroes and extreme science fiction and (occasionally) magic. Elevating the subject matters though he does, he knows at all time who he is speaking to – and speaks as one of them, only with greater authority and verve.

He recognises, as all great writers perhaps do – no matter how many stars and space cannons are exploding around the main characters – that it is the individual humanity carefully identified by the writer that each character demonstrates that pins the story to the ground and allows it to resonate with the reader. In the same way that horror relies on the reactions of the participants, Morrison crafts insane worlds that are either (mostly) wholly accepted by its participants or accepted begrudgingly by them. The level of disbelief is relieved most of all by Morrison’s dialogue in which central, authoritative figures matter of factly describe high end science fiction ideas in lyrical and poetic language that causes the reader to wish it were so and, more subtly, believe it is possible. Using real science, meticulously applied and expanded upon, Morrison creates ephemeral worlds on solid foundations, allowing a degree of believability. The idea that Lex Luthor keeps a trained Baboon dressed as Superman in his cell for instance relies on the idea that reinforces Luthor as a genius, capable of manipulating his environment and the malign patience required to train a baboon and the influence to get the materials required. This falls into Morrison’s third greatest trick; an astonishing array of subtext and context to all of his characters. This is demonstrated beautifully, with the realisation that Luthor has a cavernous escape route available at any time through a trap door in his cell. His character is yet further reinforced as Kent is met at the base of stone stairs by an ambiguously aged girl in mild S&M uniform, piloting a Gondola on an underground lake. The iconography involved draws in sexual ambiguity (what is Luthor’s relationship to the girl – later uncovered as his niece, possibly for matters of taste), themes of power and influence and the mythology of the river Styx, as the innocent Kent is slowly taken back out to the living world. This may seem overly detailed and analytical but Morrison is at least that referential. His notes to his artists perhaps second only to the great Alan Moore.

His pacing and use of character is impeccable as he inhabits the mindset and responses of all of his characters – no matter how peripheral. It is in these reactions as Lex Luthor remains steadfastly oblivious to the possibility that Clark Kent has saved him as a prison riot rages around them in All Star Superman – assuming, naturally, that he has the situation well under control when in fact Kent continues to use an array of powers beyond his notice to ease his passage and even save him from a blundering Parasite. Kent remaining true to the honest and unassuming character of Superman to great comic effect.

Arcadia Byron of the Invisibles (Vertigo)

Morrison’s first published works were Gideon Stargrave for the brilliantly titled Near Myths in 1978 at the age of 17. Soon followed Captain Clyde, an out of work superhero for the Govan Press, a local newspaper in Glasgow, plus various issues of DC Thomson’s Starblazer, the sister title to the companies Commando title and the New Adventures of Hitler. He spent much of the early 80s touring with his band The Mixers, putting out the odd Starblazer and Zoids strip for DC Thomson.

In 1982 he submitted a proposal for a storyline involving the Justice League of America and Jack Kirby’s New Gods entitled Second Coming to DC. It was dismissed but his fascination of the New Gods no doubt formed the skeleton of the enormous Final Crisis saga in which Darkseid launches armageddon on an unsuspecting world in a second age of the New Gods using Earth and its inhabitants as hosts and demonic incubators. His desire to write DC’s primary superhero group was no doubt sated with his long run on JLA in 1996 to revamp the team and bring it up to date which he pulled off with Rock of Ages, Earth 2 and World War 3 (in no particular order).

At every stage he proved time and time again that he expanded the material handed to him – writing for 2000AD with Big Dave, Future Shocks and the unusually superhuman for 2000AD – Zenith under his wing before his tenure at DC.

The Filth with Grant Morrison and Gary Erskine (2003)

Upon crossing the Atlantic he demonstrated immediately his capacity for reinventing fringe characters and enhancing them beyond the original idea – taking the near unknown fringe character Animal Man and not only imbuing his character with the real reactions of a man who could channel the powers and thoughts of animals nearby to him but forced him to look through the fourth wall at the reader – breaking the indefinable rules of the medium in the process to brilliant effect.

Morrison is known for treating mainstream established titles in the same way as fringe titles and this has earned him a status as the great re-inventor in Modern comics. He was the man to make Scott Summer’s cool again as he took hold of the X-men universe and rang the life out of it – a process he tried to make un-reconnable – Killing 16 Million Mutants and giving Professor Xavier an unborn, evil sister who returns as a mind slug and unleashes the Shi’ar navy all over the mansion. Introducing a cavalcade of new Mutants some as hilariously and poignantly useless as ‘Beaky’ the featherless, beaked bird boy who batters in the head of the newly uber-feline and faux gay Beast. Jean Grey dies but for once is given no reason to return – as psychic hyper-bitch and new headmistress of Xavier’s Emma Frost sways Scott Summer’s exhausted heart, filling the emotional vacancy usually left by Phoenix every time she summarily carks it. Magneto is beheaded after destroying half of Manhattan and Xavier’s approaches an actual curriculum and focusses on its students for the first time in its history.

Jean and the Beast (New X-Men, 2002)

Morrison often – whether intentionally or not – represents the discussion boards and blogs of the fans – testing theories that are discussed hypothetically on public pages that no one expected to see them on. Batman is killed and returned and given a son in Morrison’s watch. Jason Todd effectively returns breaking the almighty unwritten rule of comic books – partly you suspect out of sheer bloody mindedness. Morrison finally being characteristically brave to investigate the reality of Dick Grayson under the cowl.

Dick Grayson as Batman (Batman, 2009)

The content of his independent titles have become mainstream – for good or ill – leaving many readers of Final Crisis utterly confused as to what was taking place – an abstract Superman tale in which he passes through multiverses in order to combat an abstract thought form made real in storytelling in an ephemeral world populated by reality vampires via a limbo championed by an indifferent Woody Allen-alike in a jesters outfit in order to save Lois Lane in between her penultimate and final heartbeat borders on the lunatic – but is incredibly detailed and worth the three reads it takes to fully grasp the deliberately overlapping realities thrown at it.

Morrison clearly found a like mind in penciller Frank Quitely, bringing to life the inner workings of Professor X’s mind in New X-Men, the gnarled and diseased but lithely libidoed geriatric in Lust for Life from Jamie Delano’s 2020 Visions (Speakeasy comics, 2005), scraping by each other by two volumes of the Authority – Morrison on Volume 4 with Gene Ha and Quitely on Volume 2 with Mark Millar, empowered the new JLA with a little much-needed modern sheen in the book of the same name in the early naughties and reinvented the greatest super hero of them all in All-Star Superman.

But it was WE-3, the story of three prototype ‘animal weapons’ as they flee the project that ‘enhanced’ them encapsulates the creative partnership. Morrison was meticulous as ever with his descriptions and insisted on consistent and protracted revisions of minute details from Quitely in order to produce a work of rare and fine quality. This certainly was achieved as it was released via Vertigo imprint in 2004 to public and critical acclaim. Morrison’s subtlety and nuance of character supplied each of the fleeing and desperate central characters; a rabbit; a cat and a dog a bewilderingly believable character each recognisable as an individual and the drives and psychology of the animal in question. Morrison’s capacity for invention supplied the narrative with a relatively basic speech pattern simulator for each of the animals allowing them to emote through limited cognitive language in a way not human but beyond its species. The effect is a dizzying, gripping and poignant story of extreme science inflicting havoc and chaos on three innocents’ lives – each reacting in their own very specific way. In many ways WE3 is exceptional and as near perfect as a comic book can get because it uses – perhaps most transparently and as such to best effect – Morrison’s greatest creative methodology – to recognise inherent and recognisable characteristics in vulnerable and capable beings and then inflict seven hells of pseudo lunacy on them – in whatever form seems most fun!

We3 (2004, Vertigo) by Grant Morrison and Frank Quitely

Most recently, Morrison has become devoutly lambasted for his incredible work in the Batman titles; killing Batman himself, replacing him with Dick Grayson, who struggles with the responsibility of the cowl. The hardened purists in the DC readership continued to make life harder and harder for Morrison to ply his trade. That, combined with his increasingly bizarre statements about his influence and involvement in the comics industry have begun to slow the genius down. His ideas were beginning to outgrow a perhaps more commercially minded DC as it tries to keep up with it’s Red banner rival, Marvel. Increasingly limited in the titles he has been permitted to write, Morrison announced recently that he will be leaving the comics industry behind, citing specifically the antagonising nature of the hardened fan – who actively denounce any major creative changes in the writing of any major character – irrespective of sales or popularity among the general public. This is an enormous loss to the industry and should not be underestimated. Wild card though he was, Morrison was a comic book loving wild card, determined to bring innovation and broad ideas to a fairly staid and unchanging medium. This is the man who finally killed Batman, deified Superman and killed 6 million mutants in 1 issue. Let his comics epitaph read; ‘went down fighting, but took a lot of characters with him.’

Practitioners 8: Chris Weston

As a catch up for all new visitors to Beyond the Bunker, we’ll be representing the original Practitioners series 1-55 (Simon BisleyChris Bachalo and featuring the most influential comic creatives in history). Thoroughly incomplete but featuring legends like Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Frank Miller and Alan Moore already more will be hitting the site every two alternate weeks. For now though, sit back every Tuesday for a run-down of the men and women who created the comic industry we know today. (Or check the full list in the menus above). This week: British Genius, Master Draftsman and flag bearer of old and more traditional comic book art, Chris Weston.

Chris Weston – one of the more understated and unreknowned master draftsmen of English comics – was born in January 1969 in Rintein, Germany and lived in various countries as a child. Things changed for him in 1987 when he came to be apprenticed for a year under Don Lawrence, one of the first generation of UK comic book artists and reknowned for meticulously detailed work that is said to have inspired Brian Bolland and Dave Gibbons. Under Don Lawrence’s tutelage Weston gained an insight into the skills that would make him a quiet mainstay of the UK comics scene securing himself a position on the high beam of Judge Dredd under John Wagner in ‘ A Night at the Circus’ in 1988. His arrival in the British comic circuit was complete.

An assured, meticulous and precise artist he appears at first glance a draftsman before he can be considered an artist. The clarity and realism of his images denoting a controlled and technical skill in advance of most other people in his field. However, perhaps more so than his two counterparts – Bolland and Gibbons – Weston has a wry humour that spills out of his panels and a fierce and aggressive imagination that is enhanced by his realism and precision. As a result he has managed to keep up with some of the sharpest and most consistently abstract minds in the medium.

Predominantly working within DC, Wildstorm and DC Thompson titles he has crossed the atlantic several times to team up with Mark Millar on Swamp Thing, brought the hyper-abstract to life acceptable to the Human eye with on the critically acclaimed The Invisibles with Grant Morrison. His ability to imbed real human feeling to the exceptional has since seen him tackling the most popular fringe titles be published in Starman (DC), JSA (DC), Lucifer (DC) and The Authority (Wildstorm) – in which he had the chance to kill the Pope with a train carriage, consume Manhattan Island in a Super-Tsunami and send a gay pseudo Super-man to the centre of the Earth.

The Filth with Grant Morrison and Gary Erskine (2003)

Arguably, one of his greatest works was when reunited with Grant Morrison on The Filth, a 13 Issue Limited Series inked by his regular inker Gary Erskine. Within the run Weston brought to life Human Size Super-sperms rampaging on the streets of San Francisco, super intelligent scuba dolphins, landscapes made of porn and Human skin, a microcosm super Earth, pseudo maniacal Filth uniforms, vehicles and architecture including a precise and beautifully well realised Gilbert and George running things behind closed doors.

Panel after panel of awe inspiring back drops and mindblowing lunatic spectacle that few artists have managed to create. The intention of The Filth was its blending of both real world and super-states that most Super-hero or other comic books aim to create and illustrate the inner mind of Morrison something only the most adept of artists could begin to cope with. It attacks the idea and it is hard to imagine any other artist who could draw you in to the protagonist injecting his cat, pained at causing it discomfort in a non-descript and run down semi detached somewhere in South London and a Super Intelligent Chimp taking pot shots at the President of the United States – now with bitch tits – on the deck of an enormous city-ship the size of thirty city blocks (a scale he realises in one of the most impressive double page spreads in comic book history in which the aforementioned super-ship is docked in Venice – all decks accounted for and surrounded by the city itself, helicopters and boats and ships.

It is in this that Weston illustrates beautifully the disparity between the work of the artist and work of the writer. While Morrison is highly detailed in his descriptions with Weston if you say ‘a building in the background’ you will get a building correct for its geography and setting, period and price and you’ll get it with every brick visible. Weston rests his feet firmly in both fields of draftsmanship and illustration. Realising ideas most artists would struggle with for page after page within a single panel, succinctly, incredibly accurately and always entertainingly. Absurdity and reality as bedfellows in the mind of a true artist.

A scene from The Filth (2003)

The Moon And The Stars – One Week Til LFCC!

It’s been a year of showing off for the rapidly expanding UK convention circuit with mega cons old and new all duking it out to put on the best possible event for fans. Next week is the turn of one of the veterans of the scene, The London Film and Comic con and if the guest line up is anything to go by LFCC intends to come out of the corner swinging.

LFCC All Stars (left to right): Gillian Anderson, Karl Urban, Charles Dance, Alex Winter, Gates McFadden, Adam Baldwin

LFCC always have an impressive line up and this year is no different. Fans will be able to meet like likes of Alex Winter (Bill & Ted), Karl Urban (Lord of the Rings, Dredd), Gillian Anderson (X-Files) and about half the cast of Game of Thrones and Star Wars. They also have a real life Batmobile and the usual army of dealers who will be happy to sell you everything from light sabers to figurines.

The exciting thing for us however is that for the first time LFCC is hosting a dedicated comic book section, complete with signings, industry experts and (naturally) a certain Moon headed detective. Beyond The Bunker will be at LFCC for all three days so feel free to come and chat to us about comics, the creative process or whatever you fancy really. We’ll have some new badges and our fine selection of prints for sale as well as the award winning comic itself! As always, there’s a free badge with every copy so if you know anyone who doesn’t own Moon yet, drag them along and badge them up!

No copies of Moon #2 just yet but ask us about the impending Moon Launch Party for some insider info.

LFCC is next weekend at the London Olympia Grand Hall. Tickets can be bought on the door and cost a mere £6 (for regular entry)

See you there!

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10 Mistakes Made by Amateur Letterers

Nate Piekos knows a thing or two about lettering comics. Not only is he the creator of Blambot Comic Fonts but he’s also lettered books for the likes of for Dark Horse, Marvel, etc and created a fair few comics of his own. Recently Nate posted this handy guide to common mistakes made by amateur letterers. Since it’s a skill that many of us in the indy comics scene are trying to perfect, I thought I’d throw it up here. All credit for this work goes to Nate and I strongly suggest you check out the rest of his work to see these examples in action.

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Tout L’Armour: Iron Patriot shots from Iron Man 3

Yo and behold – Iron Patriot spangles up proceedings in Iron Man 3. These on-set shots from the new Avengers movie (already in production – good work Marvel!!) reveal a very starry eyed surprise for one Mr Anthony Stark. Interesting choice of Bad Guy that might’ve suggested that yet again, the Mandarin has been put on the back-burner for the new movie. But no…

While Ben Kingsley and Guy Pearce have already been confirmed to take on nemesis roles in the upcoming film, it seems that there is another villainous character on the scene.

The discovery of Iron Patriot as a potential third villain (played by James Badge Dale) suggests things might be getting a little crowded on set for part 3. Considering that no comicx book adaptation with more than one full-on super villain has ever truly worked it seems like a weird gambit on Marvel’s behalf but if anyone’s gonna pull it off… watch this space.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2152633/Iron-Man-3-villain-James-Badge-Dale-seen-Iron-Patriot-set.html#ixzz1wTVwUG8i