RIP Mœbius (1938-2012)

Jean Henri Gaston Giraud was a french comics artist, working in the french tradition of bandes dessinées (literally drawn strip or BDs).Known more prominently as Mœbius, and to a lesser extent Gir, the latter appearing in a boxed form at the bottom of the artists paintings.

His work has influenced generations of artists around the world for years. His transcendent, highly detailed technical ability belying the incredible simplicity of his compositions. The idea shines most brightly in most of Mœbius’ work, rendered with a clarity of vision rarely seen in any other artist.



Among his most famous creation was the Western comic series “Blueberry” which he cocreated with Jean-Michel Charlier, one of the first Western anti-heroes to appear in comics. Under the pseudonym Moebius he created a wide range of science fiction and and fantasy comics in a highly imaginative and surreal almost abstract style, the most famous of which are Arzach and the Airtight Garage of Jerry Cornelius, and the The Incal. Blueberry was adapted for the screen in 2004, and in 1997 Moebius and cocreator Alejandro Jodorowsky sued Luc Besson for using the Incal as inspiration for his movie The Fifth Element, a lawsuit which they lost.

Moebius contributed storyboards and concept designs to numerous science fiction and fantasy films, including Alien, Willow, and Tron.

Mœbius has given the most famous western artists and film makers their style. Modern industry legends such as Simon Bisley or Frank Quitely, Liam Sharp or Jamie Hewlett have drawn hhuge swathes of inspiration from his work.

The world of comics is significantly poorer without him, or would be had his legacy already been so securely etched into the rock face of modern comics art. An inspiration and an example to all artists arriving into the world now, Jean Henri Gaston Giraud’s effect will be felt for a great many years to come – perhaps as long as comic books exist.

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Karakuri: The first Japanese Clockwork Robots

Karakuri from Matthew Allard on Vimeo.

The Japanese have had more than a passing interest in robotics for generations. Well before the term robotics was coined the fine art of engineering Karakuri was developed. The patient and refined art of creating small clockwork models move in an almost unimaginably natural and refined way. Check this out to see a lady robot right a tiny Japanese symbol and then nod suggestively at you. Beautiful and a testament to fine artists and engineers and designers who slave everywhere to bring pieces of rare and unimaginable beauty.