Lost Jedi: The Clawing Legion

Based on characters and actors from the Star Wars Exhibition in London in 2007, the Lost Jedi is an epic tale featuring unknown Jedi and Imperialist forces as well as some well known faces (Darth Sidious, Vader and Jedi Master Yoda are all featured in the collection). Collected here are the developed character designs and intended basic plot lines for the Lost Jedi. The Lost Jedi is a non-profit fan project based on Star Wars.

The first specialist, non-clone forces chosen to wear Imperial armour, each is handed an entire unit of specialist Clone Troopers and sent out into the galaxy to locate and destroy any remaining pockets of resistance – and specifically, Jedi. Specialists in various fields they are each chosen on the merit (or demerit) of their past. With nothing to lose – facing death sentences in each of their respective systems – this is their final reprieve. Do or die. Between them they are responsible for more than 12 Jedi kills during the course of the Lost Jedi. However, not without enormous losses, including their own lives. Only one member of Clawing Legion makes it to the Barren Moon for the final showdown. But which?

Trooper Schemi Ikel

Commander Tee Ald

Trooper Wes Nadir

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Friday Film – Ragnarok Dawn Part 2

Every Friday we descend into the vaults here at Bunker HQ and dig out one of the many fine (and occasionally not so fine) films that we have produced over the years. Come join us for another instalment of cinematic silliness.

First came the trailer, then part 1 and now at last we come to the end of our little zombie adventure…and there’s actually zombies this week! The second half our our ambitious short film comes complete with some really cool fight choreography from Mr Paul O’Shea, some rather dodgy hair acting from me and a bit of religious imagery that is about as subtle as David Bowie’s trousers. The things we do when we are young! Enjoy!

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Friday Film – Ragnarok Dawn Part 1

Every Friday we descend into the vaults here at Bunker HQ and dig out one of the many fine (and occasionally not so fine) films that we have produced over the years. Come join us for another instalment of cinematic silliness.

Click here for part 2

Last week we brought you the trailer to our Vikings vs Zombies short, Ragnarok Dawn. This we we have part 1 of the finished film. It was produced a few years ago for the 2 Days Later film competition and, as per the rules, was written, shot and edited in just 48 hours. As you’d imagine, it’s pretty rough around the edges (the heavens saw fit to furnish us with the only day of glorious sunshine all autumn in order to shoot our dark horror story) and the script could probably do with a little bit a tweaking, but all things considered we’re still pretty proud of it. The amount of goodwill from the massive cast and crew, all of which gave up their time, talent and patience at extremely short notice and for no money whatsoever. It’s people like that who make this very stressful projects worth doing.

Next week, part 2!

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Friday Film – Ragnarok Dawn Trailer

Every Friday we descend into the vaults here at Bunker HQ and dig out one of the many fine (and occasionally not so fine) films that we have produced over the years. Come join us for another instalment of cinematic silliness.

This week we have part 1 of a triple helping of Zombie chopping action. Produced for the 2008 Two Days Later festival, this was the first project that Steve and I worked on. The result was conceptually fabulous and logistically terrible.

The film itself is the age of tale of Viking meets Zombie and considering it was made for no money whatsoever, it’s not all that bad. The trailer you see here remains inexplicably popular on youtube (infuriatingly so given how quick it was to put together) and returning to the project tentatively remains close to the top of our ‘to do’ list.

Part 1 of the film itself will be up next week.but for now we invite you to simply enjoy the original in all its Norwegian murdering glory.

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A Black Viking?!

Heimdall as drawn by Olivier Coipel

Mark Millar’s been highlighting an interesting story on his blog this week. It seems that white supremacist groups are rather ticked off about the casting of black actor, Idris Elba as Heimdall in the upcoming Thor movie.  According to the rather bluntly named Boycott-Thor.com “Marvel has now inserted social engineering into European mythology.” They’re also quite keen to point out that The Guardian newspaper wrote an article saying that Thor was probably going to be crap (nothing to do with the racial aspect, The Guardian just don’t like super hero movies). Yep, white supremacists are quoting the Guardian as a source. Go figure.

I wouldn’t normally bother responding to something as daft as this. Pretty much every fantasy movie manages to offend some nut job about something or other, but in this case it relates to a question that we actually had to look at in the course of one of our projects. The first film that Steve and I did together was a Viking horror short called Ragnarok Dawn set in the mid 11th Century in the twilight of the pagan Viking era. During the casting process we were offered a chance to work with a very talented black actor by the name of Noel Wesley and so found ourselves asking the same question that is being banded around here: were there black Vikings?

Well the short answer is, ‘we don’t know.’ Despite what the people behind such campaigns as Boycott-Thor might wish you to believe, a pile of bones don’t tell you a lot about the colour of a person’s skin. But we can make an educated guess based on what we know about Viking history. It’s easy to think of the Vikings as a bunch of guys who lived on the coast of Denmark and occasionally popped over to pillage Yorkshire but this is a long way from the truth. The term ‘Viking’ is a catch all term for an extremely varied set of groups which, at their peak, were active in almost every corner of the known world and beyond. There are the Vikings of Leif Ericson, who landed in Canada; the Rus, whose influence stretched all the way to the walls of Babylon and Constantinople (and who may or may not have a fairly major modern country named after them depending on who you talk to); even the Normans, those great paragons of Frenchness, were originally of Viking stock. By the end of what we could rather loosely call ‘the Viking age’ being a Viking was far less about where you were from and more about the way you lived and thus it was very hard to say exactly what a Viking was. So it’s safe to say that Vikings would have had direct contact with black people but did they recruit any into their fold? Again it’s hard to say for sure, but it’s important to remember that the Vikings were, above many things, practical. If you are putting together a Viking crew on the shores of the Black Sea and you don’t have enough native Scandinavians to make up the numbers are you honestly going to trek all the way back to Norway to find more? Cities like Constantinople were melting pots of different cultures and to assume that the Vikings were immune to the kind of natural multiculturalism that occurs in such environments defies logic.

I actually pinched this image from a neo-nazi blog, so thanks go to them for providing high res images with which to undermine their hate filled bullshit.

So we can say that historically speaking, there is a basis for saying that you could find a black man on a Viking crew (which is why you can see Mr Wesley’s fine performance in our humble film), but what about having a black man playing a norse god? Well this can probably best be summed up with the following statement:

IT’S A FUCKING SUPERHERO FILM!

Seriously. This is a movie about a guy who throws a shoots lighting out of his face, fights trolls on the streets of small American towns and has a cape that considers the laws of physics to be ‘something other people do’. It’s based on a fictional comic that is based on fictional myths about fictional people. That’s so many levels from reality that you don’t get to complain about historical inaccuracies any more than you get to complain about the fact that Tony Stark can land the Iron Man at full speed and not turn to jelly inside the thing. Elba himself was interviewed about this by the Radio Times a while back and I think he probably sums it up better than anyone:

“Hang about, Thor’s mythical, right? Thor has a hammer that flies to him when he clicks his fingers. That’s OK, but the color of my skin is wrong? I was cast in Thor and I’m cast as a Nordic god. If you know anything about the Nords, they don’t look like me but there you go. I think that’s a sign of the times for the future. I think we will see multi-level casting. I think we will see that, and I think that’s good.”

Good on you sir.

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