Top 5: Dropping Science

I started Dropping Science back in April as a way of sharing science & space stories that were of interest to me. As you might imagine for someone who writes a comic about the Moon, science is a pretty big part of my writing process and it seemed like it would be cool to share some of that stuff with fans of the book. 8 months on and it’s become one of my favourite parts of the whole site. I spend hours some weeks, scouring the net for interesting stuff to post here and in doing so I’ve discovered some amazing vidoes. Some are crazy, some are inspiring but they’re all a tonne of fun to watch. So without further delay, on to my top 5 Dropping Science posts of 2011:

5. The Ghost Rocket

This video is a short documentary by Coffee and Celluloid Productions which tells the story of Florida’s short lived space program. During the space race a company called Aerojet-General built the world’s largest solid fuel rocket at a facility deep in the Everglades. The rocket was intended for the Apollo program but Aerojet lost the contract and the base has just sat quietly rusting away in the swap ever since.

4. How Much Does The Internet Weigh?

 has fast become one of my favourite stops for zaney science facts. In this video, Michael walks us through one of the great questions of humanity…just how much do all those cat videos weigh?

3. The Physics Of My Little Pony

While a lot of the science covered on DS is about astronomy, we do occasionally like to branch out into other fields of science such as magical flying ponies. Physics student, Stephen Magnet put together this presentation for his class, in which he examines just how faithful to the laws of physics those damn ponies are. He became my new hero overnight.

2. Time Lapse Video of the Milky Way

I have a bit of a habit on Dropping Science of being sidetracked by pretty timelapse videos of the night sky. These films don’t necessarily teach us anything new about our galaxy but as an inspirational tool I think they more than earn their place among the other offerings. This video by the incredibly talented Terje Sorgjerd was the first such film that I came across and it remains my favourite.

1. The Pale Blue Dot

This is the video that made me want to start Dropping Science in the first place, so I think it’s only fair that it takes then number 1 spot here. Adam Winnik‘s gorgeous animation accompanying the timeless words of Carl Sagan. I still get goosebumps when I watch it.

Dropping Science runs every Saturday here at Beyond The Bunker. You can find the full archive by clicking here

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Dropping Science: Terje Sorgjerd’s The Arctic Light.

This feature does kinda stray at times into “Dropping stunning photography” but I’m not sure that’s a bad thing. Regular visitors to the blog will know what a fan I am of the work of Terje Sorgjerd and so it was probably only a matter of time before I had to post up his most recent work. Filmed between 29th April and 10th May 2011 in the Arctic, on the archipelago Lofoten in Norway, this is one of Sorgjerd’s finest works to date. I’d strongly suggest going to the vimeo page for this vid once you’ve finished here and reading his full account of the expedition, it’s true pioneer photography. Here’s a small snippet:

“Based on previous experience, I knew this was going to be a very difficult trip. Having lost a couple of cameras and some other equipment up there before, it was crucial to bring an extra set of everything. I also made sure I had plenty of time in case something went wrong. If you can imagine roping down mountain cliffs, or jumping around on slippery rocks covered in seaweed with 2 tripods, a rail, a controller, camera, lenses, filters and rigging for 4-5 hour long sequences at a time, and then having to calculate the rise and fall of the tides in order to capture the essence – it all proved bit of a challenge.”

We’re at the London Film and Comic Con all this weekend. Follow @danthompson2099 for regular updates.

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Dropping Science: Terje Sorgjerd’s “The Aurora” is Simply Stunning

A couple of weeks ago I posted THIS video by Norwegian photographer, Terje Sorgjerd. His images of the night sky have continued to blow me away every time I look them up, so I thought it was about time to share another fine example.

This is footage of one of the largest auroras in recent years, captured in and around Kirkenes and Pas National Park bordering Russia. I shan’t say any more about it as it speaks for itself, just watch and feel free to join me in awe.

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Dropping Science: Time Lapse Video of The Milky Way

Terje Sorgjerd is a Norwegian photographer who, while trekking on Spain’s tallest mountain, El Teide, decided to shoot some time lapse footage of the sky. El Teide is known as being on of the best places on earth to observe the wonders of space and the result of his efforts is one of the most beautiful videos I’ve seen in many a year.

I’m going to try and keep finding fun space related stuff to post up every Saturday here, so check back next week. I’ve got a pretty good one in mind.

Have a good weekend!

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